mrgn:

What new a difference 8 years makes. St. Peter’s Square in 2005 vs. 2013.
- NBCnews’s Instagram

mrgn:

What new a difference 8 years makes. St. Peter’s Square in 2005 vs. 2013.

- NBCnews’s Instagram

Reblogged from mrgn mssn
kdnewman:

Press : Publishers are charging more for digital content and offering less free

According to Press data, the average price of a monthly digital subscription is now $9.26 — up from $6.85 at the beginning of 2012. Publishers are also offering fewer articles for free before a user hits a paywall.

via paidContent

kdnewman:

Press : Publishers are charging more for digital content and offering less free

According to Press data, the average price of a monthly digital subscription is now $9.26 — up from $6.85 at the beginning of 2012. Publishers are also offering fewer articles for free before a user hits a paywall.

via paidContent

Reblogged from Kevin Newman
world-shaker:

10 Reasons Facebook Fails Education
Absolutely spot-on. Here are two from the list:

7. Ideas are dead.
Just as discourse is dead on Facebook, along with that comes the sharing of ideas. I think Facebook belittles idea sharing. Big ideas are reduced to quote sharing (which I admit I do).  Just as the consumption of video on the Internet has been reduced to 1-4 minutes max, just the same, the sharing of ideas on Facebook has been reduced to a sentence. This has turned my Facebook wall into a warped version of the Hallmark store.
6. Over-notified.
Besides being added to groups that you’re not asked to be in, asked to use or install apps, or invited to too many events-  the notifications in Facebook also requires too much management. To add to this, many people  are still crossposting from their other social networks; I find that Facebook is cluttered, and not filled with much substance. Cross-posting from Twitter is a behavior that’s frustrating. If I just read your post on Twitter, seeing it on Facebook, belittles the share. And, just from observation, it looks lazy. I realize that you can change settings on Facebook, mute people’s posts and such, but that’s way too much management involved.  It shouldn’t be this hard. Educators like Miguel Guhlin have started over completely- removing almost all of his friends, and asking you now to “Subscribe” to his posts.  That’s certainly a strategy. Is that too much?

world-shaker:

10 Reasons Facebook Fails Education

Absolutely spot-on. Here are two from the list:

7. Ideas are dead.

Just as discourse is dead on Facebook, along with that comes the sharing of ideas. I think Facebook belittles idea sharing. Big ideas are reduced to quote sharing (which I admit I do).  Just as the consumption of video on the Internet has been reduced to 1-4 minutes max, just the same, the sharing of ideas on Facebook has been reduced to a sentence. This has turned my Facebook wall into a warped version of the Hallmark store.

6. Over-notified.

Besides being added to groups that you’re not asked to be in, asked to use or install apps, or invited to too many events-  the notifications in Facebook also requires too much management. To add to this, many people  are still crossposting from their other social networks; I find that Facebook is cluttered, and not filled with much substance. Cross-posting from Twitter is a behavior that’s frustrating. If I just read your post on Twitter, seeing it on Facebook, belittles the share. And, just from observation, it looks lazy. I realize that you can change settings on Facebook, mute people’s posts and such, but that’s way too much management involved.  It shouldn’t be this hard. Educators like Miguel Guhlin have started over completely- removing almost all of his friends, and asking you now to “Subscribe” to his posts.  That’s certainly a strategy. Is that too much?

Reblogged from World-Shaker
good:


A Library for the Subway- Adele Peters posted in Design, Product Design and Technology
Let’s say you’re stuck on the F train, trying to ignore the person coughing on you, a screaming baby, and a someone staring creepily. (No, I’m not describing my morning). Wish you hadn’t forgotten a book? Here’s an interesting idea from a group of design students: using tech to bring you the first 10 pages of a popular book on your phone, and then telling you the nearest public library where you can go pick up the actual book. Nice way to possibly get more people back in libraries.

good:

A Library for the Subway
Adele Peters posted in Design, Product Design and Technology

Let’s say you’re stuck on the F train, trying to ignore the person coughing on you, a screaming baby, and a someone staring creepily. (No, I’m not describing my morning). Wish you hadn’t forgotten a book? Here’s an interesting idea from a group of design students: using tech to bring you the first 10 pages of a popular book on your phone, and then telling you the nearest public library where you can go pick up the actual book. Nice way to possibly get more people back in libraries.

Reblogged from

reportagebygettyimages:

‘[In South Sudan], women are really defined by their ability to get married and have children.’ Report from HRW, with photos by Brent Stirton

humanrightswatch:

Child Marriage: South Sudan

This visually stunning short film tells the story of child marriage in South Sudan. According to government statistics, close to half (48 percent) of South Sudanese girls between 15 and 19 are married, with some marrying as young as age 12.

Read more after the jump.

Reblogged from

escapekit:

 The Movable Book of Letterforms

USA-based graphic designer and book artist Kevin Steele has created The Movable Book of Letterforms, a delightful book that will teach you all you need to know about typography. 

Click the video below to see the book in action

Reblogged from Escape Kit
Emerging Student Patterns in MOOCs: A Graphical View
Phil Hill, mfeldstein.com
Thanks to feedback from my last post, I have modified the proposed description of patterns for students engaged in MOOCs. I also want to introduce a graphic to visually represent these patterns.• I have removed the language comparing passive…

Emerging Student Patterns in MOOCs: A Graphical View
Phil Hill, mfeldstein.com

Thanks to feedback from my last post, I have modified the proposed description of patterns for students engaged in MOOCs. I also want to introduce a graphic to visually represent these patterns.• I have removed the language comparing passive…

Reblogged from P A Martin Börjesson
infographicjournal:

37 Ways to Repurpose a Blog Post

infographicjournal:

37 Ways to Repurpose a Blog Post

Reblogged from Infographic Journal
chartier:

Ok, Tumblr Stats is cool.

via I Love Charts
Reblogged from Tumblr de Chartier